Baskerville | Capital A | John Baskerville

FF Meta | Small G | Erik Spiekermann

Klinic | Small K | Joe Prince

Adobe Caslon | Capital W | William Caslon

Didot | Capital T | Firmin Didot

Univers | Small e | Adrian Frutiger

Centaur | Capital C | Bruce Rogers

Klinic Slab | small m | Joe Prince

Trade Gothic| Capital R | Jackson Burke

Adobe Caslon | small a | William Caslon

Find the BAR

No: 01/10

Find the Loop

No: 02/10

Find the Arm

No: 03/10

Find the Vertex

No: 04/10

Find the Beak

No: 05/10

Find the Counter

No: 06/10

Find the Stresss

No: 07/10

Find the Crotch

No: 08/10

Find the Juncture

No: 09/10

Find the Bowl

No: 10/10

Bar

The (usually) horizontal stroke across the middle of uppercase A and H is a bar. The horizontal or sloping stroke enclosing the bottom of the eye of an e is also a bar.

No: 01/10

  • Loop

    In a double-storey g, the loop is the enclosed or partially enclosed counter below the baseline that is connected to the bowl by a link.The enclosed or partially enclosed extenders on cursive p, b, l, and similiar letters are also called loops.

    No: 02/10

  • Arm

    The arm of a letter is the horizontal stroke on some characters that does not connect to a stroke or stem at one or both ends. The top of the capital T and the horizontal strokes of the F and E are examples of arms. Additionally, the diagonal upward stroke on a K is its arm. Sometimes arm is used interchangeably with bar or crossbar or cross stroke.

    No: 03/10

  • Vertex

    The outside point at the bottom or top of a character where two strokes meet. A point (as of an angle, polygon, polyhedron, graph, or network) that terminates a line or curve or comprises the intersection of two or more lines or curves.

    No: 04/10

  • Beak

    A beak is a type of decorative stroke at the end of the arm of a letter, connected to the arm by the terminal. Similar to a spur or serif, it is usually more pronounced.

    No: 05/10

  • Counter

    In typography, the enclosed or partially enclosed circular or curved negative space (white space) of some letters such as d, o, and s is the counter.

    No: 06/10

  • Stress

    In typography, stress is not a bad thing. The direction in which a curved stroke changes weight. The diagonal, vertical, or horizontal thick-to-thin transition in the stroke of a letter is the stress.

    No: 07/10

  • Crotch

    An acute, inside angle where two strokes meet.

    No: 08/10

  • Juncture

    The shape or manner in which come together and a connection is made. Ink traps are sometimes made by creating a small wedge of white space at the juncture.

    No: 09/10

  • Bowl

    The (usually) horizontal stroke across the middle of uppercase A and H is a bar. The horizontal or sloping stroke enclosing the bottom of the eye of an e is also a bar.

    No: 10/10